Shopping Cart
Your Cart is Empty
Quantity:
Subtotal
Taxes
Shipping
Total
There was an error with PayPalClick here to try again
CelebrateThank you for your business!You should be receiving an order confirmation from Paypal shortly.Exit Shopping Cart

California School Fiscal Services

Providing comprehensive business office and consulting services to K-12 traditional schools and charters

Blog

Blog

Regs would outlaw classes that lack education content

Posted on March 8, 2016 at 1:35 PM
On its face, it is hard to believe that this is happening in California schools.  I suspect that at the root of it is faulty master scheduling and poor enrollment projections.  Both of these tasks are related to the business office.

There are some excellent trainings available on building master schedules.  When was the last time anyone from your district attended one? Principals, Assistant Principals, High School Counselors, and District Office staff need to make sure they have an adequate skill set to develop a strong master schedule.  Without one, this can be the consequence and it is a disservice to our students.  

If your enrollment projections are getting the best of you,then it's time to employ an expert to come in and get you headed in the right direction. The best in the business is Dean Walfogel with DecisionInsight.  Their website is: www. decisioninsite.com/about-us/

------------------------------

MARCH 08, 2016


 

by Kimberly Beltran

(Calif.) The State Board of Education on Wednesday will consider adopting emergency regulations designed to prohibit high schools from assigning students to “faux” or repeat classes that rob them of learning time.

 

The new rules, if accepted, specify conditions that constitute “previously completed” courses or those “without educational content,” and require school principals to maintain written records attesting to the fact that no students have been assigned to such classes unless the conditions have been met.

 

The proposed regulations stem from Assembly Bill 1012, adopted last fall by the Legislature in response to a lawsuit filed against the state by a group of students represented by the ACLU Foundation of Southern California and Public Counsel Law Center. Gov. Jerry Brown signed the bill into law on Oct. 9, 2015.

 

“Passage of AB 1012 served as a basis for settlement of the lawsuit, Cruz, et al. v. State of California, et al, filed in Alameda County Superior Court,” staff from the California Department of Education wrote in a report to the state board. “Both the legislation and the settlement of the litigation target full implementation for the 2016-17 school year, which begins July 1, 2016.”

 

In Cruz, students from seven schools throughout the state claimed that they were being denied equal access to educational opportunities by, among other things, being placed in classes labeled “service periods” or “work experience” for lengthy amounts of time.

 

The issue made headlines in the fall of 2014 when students at Jefferson High School in the Los Angeles Unified School District walked out of class during their third week of school in protest over a new scheduling system which failed to assign students to classes and assigned some to classes they'd already taken. Students reported sitting in auditoriums all day for days while course schedules were worked out, and teachers found elementary school students listed on high school attendance sheets.

 

The practice, however, was found to be more widespread than just LAUSD with students from schools in both the Compton and Oakland districts also reporting improper class placements, including those labeled “service periods” or “inside work experience” where they sacrifice classroom and learning time to make copies, run errands, water plants, sort faculty mail, or make coffee.

 

Under the new law, high schools will be barred from assigning students to “any course period without educational content” for more than a week each semester; they can’t reenroll students in classes they’ve already passed, and any noncompliance will be subject to a complaint process.

 

According to the CDE staff report, Education Code section 51228.1 specifically “provides that for a pupil placed in a course without educational content for more than one week, the conditions are:

 

A pupil is assigned to that course only if the pupil or, for a pupil who has not reached the age of majority, the pupil’s parent, guardian, or educational rights holder has consented in writing to the assignment;

A school official has determined that the pupil will benefit from being assigned to the course period; and

The principal or assistant principal of the school has stated in a written document maintained at the school that, for the relevant school year, no pupils are assigned to those classes unless the school has met the conditions specified in these two paragraphs.”

Additionally, CDE said, AB 1012 prohibits school districts from assigning any pupil to a course period without educational content because there are not sufficient curricular course offerings for the student to take during the designated school day.

 

Further, “Education Code section 51228.2 provides the conditions for a student placed in a course previously completed, as follows:

 

The course has been designed to be taken more than once because pupils are exposed to a new curriculum year to year; or

For any course not designed to be taken more than once, the following conditions are met:

A pupil is assigned to the course only if the pupil or, for a pupil who has not reached the age of majority, the pupil’s parent, guardian, or educational rights holder has consented in writing to the assignment for the purpose of improving a lower grade; and

A school official has determined that the pupil will benefit from being assigned to the course period; and

The principal or assistant principal of the school has stated in a written document to be maintained at the school that, for the relevant school year, no pupils are assigned to those classes unless the school has met the two conditions above.”

The CDE is recommending that the SBE adopt emergency regulations “to incorporate the form of the written statement required by AB 1012 and to allow for the successful implementation of these laws by July 1, 2016.”

 

The new law and regulations allow complaints for noncompliance to be filed under the Uniform Complaint Procedures beginning in the 2016-17 school year.

 

 


Categories: Supporting Educational Support Systems

Post a Comment

Oops!

Oops, you forgot something.

Oops!

The words you entered did not match the given text. Please try again.

3 Comments

Reply Long Julia
1:03 PM on May 17, 2021 
Good post. I learn something new and challenging on sites I stumbleupon on a daily basis. It's always interesting to read through articles from other writers and use something from other websites. |
Long Julia https://bit.ly/3wb9ETT
Reply pew pew madafakas meaning
10:13 PM on May 11, 2021 
It's in fact very difficult in this busy life to listen news on TV, so I just use web for that reason, and get the most up-to-date news.|
pew pew madafakas meaning https://feqatyzi.wixsite.com/pew-pew-madafakas
Reply cialis 10mg
6:40 AM on January 4, 2021 
hello guos 9128738517
0